Posts Tagged ‘danielle paige’

Hello, yes I know I’ve missed a reading roundup – my apologies for that.  I’ve had a lot of shifts at work and was working some crazy hours over the last few weeks.  Also I had a virus which left me rather run down.  Also, there were some great season finale TV shows on – Game of Thrones and Outlander – which I really wanted to watch.  Also LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens won’t play itself.  Anyway, enough excuses.

Right now I’m in a kind of reading slump.  I have many, many books in my TBR, but none of them are taking my fancy.  Don’t you just hate that?  I have hopes that Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch may help ease me out of that slump.

Since my last roundup, I have managed to finish a few books, and consign one to my Did Not Finish pile.  Sorry The Crown’s Game, you just didn’t grab my interest fast enough.

The books I completed were Paper and Fire by Rachel Caine, for which you should have seen a full review go up earlier this week, Stealing Snow by Danielle Paige, one of the ARCs I received at BEA 2016 and On the Merits of Unnaturalness by Samantha Shannon.

Danielle Paige’s Stealing Snow was one of my most anticipated ARCs from BEA and I was really looking forward to reading it.  However, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I’d hoped.  I will write a full review nearer to the time.  I didn’t find Snow as engaging a protagonist as Dorothy Must Die’s Amy Gumm, and I personally prefer the world of Oz to Hans Christian Andersen’s world.  From Dorothy Must Die, I know that Paige’s narrative and characters become much stronger as the series progresses so I will be more than happy to check out book two. I gave Stealing Snow three and a half stars out of five.

On the Merits of Unnaturalness by Samantha Shannon is a companion novella to her Bone Season series.  At only 37 pages it is very short, but it is jam packed with worldbuilding and useful information.  It is written as an in-world pamphlet explaining the different orders of clairvoyants appearing in the series.  The Bone Season series is one that is really growing on me as it progresses – we’re at book two of a seven book series – and this novella has really whetted my appetite for The Song Rising due in March 2017.

That’s all for today.  Have a great weekend!

Reading roundup – July 15h 2016 was originally published on Canadian eReader

My last entry talked about my favourite books of 2015, so now it’s time to talk about my most anticipated books of 2016.

Passenger by Alexandra BrackenPassenger is the latest book by Alexandra Bracken.  it is the start of a new YA series and is billed as a YA treasure hunt through time.  I really loved Bracken’s Darkest Minds series, so this sounds like a real winner to me.  The publisher has released a sampler, which I encourage you to check out.  Passenger is officially released in just a few days on January 5th 2016.

Lady Midnight by Cassandra ClareThis is the first book in a new series by Mortal Instruments writer Cassandra Clare.  It is set in the same world of the Shadowhunters but the action takes place in Los Angeles.  At first, I’d been a little sceptical of the setting; the older cities of London and New York seemed a more natural fit for vampires and demons than sunny Los Angeles.  However, the last book in the Mortal Instruments series, City of Heavenly Fire, functioned as much as a setup for this new series, introducing characters, locations and possible plotlines in the new series, and I am 100% convinced now.  I will certainly be devouring Lady Midnight when it is released on March 8th 2016.

Yellow Brick War by Danielle PaigeYellow Brick War is the third and final book in the Dorothy Must Die series by Danielle Paige.  This series is set in the world of L Frank Baum’s Oz in which Dorothy has turned wicked.  While I loved the world and protagonist – Amy Gumm – is wonderfully kick ass, yet real and flawed – but I was unhappy with the pacing of the first book.  The second book, The Wicked Will Rise, fixed these issues and had such a fantastic cliffhanger ending that I can’t wait to see what happens next.  Yellow Brick War is released on March 15th 2016.

Paper and Fire by Rachel CainePaper and Fire is the second in Rachel Caine’s Great Library series. I was originally drawn to Ink and Bone because of the world – a world in which the Great Library of Alexandria survives and exercises complete control over all published work.  Our protagonist discovers a way to break the Library’s control and ends up in danger.  With this book I came for the concept and stayed for the characters.  They are both engaging and intriguing and I can’t wait to see what happens next.  Paper and Fire is released on July 5th.

The next book in Scott Lynch’s Gentlemen Bastards series, The Thorn of Emberlain is scheduled to be released on July 21st 2016.  At least that’s what Amazon tells me.  I’m not certain how official that date is – it has been put back several times.  In any case, this is one book I am very much looking forward to.  I love the characters, the world and the writing is so sharp and witty.  I look forward to what the future holds for Locke.

The final book I’d like to mention is Heartless by Marissa Meyer.  This is a new series set in the world of Alice in Wonderland in the same way that the Lunar Chronicles were a retelling of traditional fairytales.  Other than the brief synopsis, not much has been revealed about this book.  I look forward to picking it up on November 8th 2016.

One book that I am not holding my breath anticipating in 2016 is George R.R. Martin’s continuation of The Song of Ice and Fire, The Winds of Winter.  In a recent blog post, Martin confirmed what most of us had expected: Winds of Winter will not be published before the upcoming sixth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones.  While disappointing, this is not surprising.  However, the tone of Martin’s post suggests that he still has a lot of work to do, and that he cannot say when it will be completed.  I’ll be interested to see how that affects viewing of the series.  Personally, I’m going to watch it and treat it like any other book adaptation – I’ll enjoy watching David and Dan’s interpretation and then read the original whenever Martin publishes it.  I do have more faith in Martin’s handling of the characters though.

Reading through my preorders and my most anticipated list, I see that the vast majority of them are YA fantasy type books.  One of my goals for 2016 should be to expand my reading genres.  That may be tricky – there are just so many good YA books coming out and so little time to read.  I do have some historical fiction, some Outlander and some biographies to read.  I also see that all of them are by authors with whom I’m already familiar.  That is probably also something to work on in 2016.  Because not yet published books don’t have Kindle previews, I’m a little more reluctant to commit my money to an unknown.  

This year I have set my GoodReads reading challenge to 80 books.  I feel that should be doable, even if I do listen to more audiobooks.

One very exciting thing I’m really looking forward to this year is attending BEA in Chicago!  This will be my first visit to the book expo and I’m so excited at the opportunity to spend time with people who are as passionate about books as I am.  I look forward to seeing some of you there.

Most anticipated reads of 2016 and other news was originally published on Canadian eReader

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige was one of my most anticipated reads of the season.  I read and loved the prequel – No Place Like Oz –  and indeed my desire to read Dorothy Must Die sent me into a reading slump for a while as nothing else hit the spot.  Having read it, I can say that, while there was a lot to enjoy about Dorothy Must Die it didn’t quite live up to my anticipation.

What I liked

The protagonist.  I really liked our protagonist, Amy Gumm, and enjoyed following her journey. She is a strong, kick-ass heroine, yet is dealing with her own internal demons and has her own buttons that can be pressed.  Coming from Kansas as she does, she is the reader’s inroad to Dorothy’s Oz.  Many parallels are drawn between Amy and Dorothy; both are originally from Kansas, both were feeling trapped in their mundane lives with little escape from their farm/small town before their arrival in Oz.  Both are sensitive to the magic that is all around in Oz.

The worldbuilding.  While it’s fair to say that L. Frank Baum did a lot of the heavy lifting in his creation of the world of Oz, Paige has added her own twist to the world.   Baum’s Oz is clearly identifiable in the book, but there is a much darker twist to it with Dorothy’s influence.  It’s based on the children’s novels rather than the 1939 Judy Garland film in that there are characters mentioned who are in the books not in the movie, and also that the original slippers are silver not red.  I would suggest you read No Place Like Oz first before coming to Dorothy Must Die to get an idea of the background.

Good vs Wicked and Trust.  The question of trust and whom to trust and whom not to trust comes up too many times for it not to be a major theme in the series.  Amy is working for the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked and is repeatedly advised by the operatives not to trust anyone.  It’s clear that they don’t trust Amy either, keeping her in the dark until the last possible moment.  It’s a common trope in good vs evil fantasy that the good guys always win because they trust their colleagues to have their backs and are willing to sacrifice themselves for the greater good whereas the bad guys are too busy looking out for themselves to implement any cohesive plans or trust their colleagues to work with them.  Although the so-called wicked have come together in Dorothy Must Die they don’t have that trust that good guys have.  It’s an interesting twist and I look forward to seeing how it plays out in subsequent books.

Writing style.  I did enjoy Paige’s writing style.  It came across as fresh and immediate and really brought me into the story.

What I didn’t like

Pacing.  Here we come to the main problem I had with Dorothy Must Die; the pacing was off.  For a significant chunk of the first half of the book Amy is training with the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked yet, due to trust issues mentioned above, has not been given a goal to work towards except the vague Dorothy Must Die.  This section drags on far too long and really slows the book down.  I would encourage you to work past this section though – it improves a lot once Amy is working on a more specific goal.

Misleading marketing.  HarperCollins’ blurb for Dorothy Must Die contains the following:

“My name is Amy Gumm—and I’m the other girl from Kansas.I’ve been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked.I’ve been trained to fight.And I have a mission: Remove the Tin Woodman’s heart.Steal the Scarecrow’s brain.Take the Lion’s courage.Then and only then—Dorothy must die!”

If that is the blurb you’re using to hook readers into the book, it might be a good idea to have your protagonist actually work towards that goal in that book and not have it be a supposed finale twist that Dorothy can’t die until the Tin Woodman, Scarecrow and Lion have been neutralised.  Clearly, it’s a blurb for the series as a whole not just Dorothy Must Die.  When reading the book please bear this in mind so that you are not frustrated at the end.

The audio narration.  In general I really liked Devon Sorvari’s narration.  She really brought out Amy’s strength of character and kick-ass attitude.  However there were long pauses left at the end of each paragraph – long enough to be very noticeable and very irritating.  I kept wondering if I’d reached the end of a chapter.  Of course, it may not bother you at all.  Here’s a sample.

In general though I really enjoyed Dorothy Must Die and will definitely continue with the rest of the series.  Amy is a really great character and I love the world of Oz.  I look forward to seeing more.

I gave Dorothy Must Die four stars out of five.

 buy from Amazon, Kobo, iTunes, Audible, eBooks.com

four-stars

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige – Review was originally published on Canadian eReader

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige was one of my most anticipated reads of the season.  I read and loved the prequel – No Place Like Oz –  and indeed my desire to read Dorothy Must Die sent me into a reading slump for a while as nothing else hit the spot.  Having read it, I can say that, while there was a lot to enjoy about Dorothy Must Die it didn’t quite live up to my anticipation.

What I liked

The protagonist.  I really liked our protagonist, Amy Gumm, and enjoyed following her journey. She is a strong, kick-ass heroine, yet is dealing with her own internal demons and has her own buttons that can be pressed.  Coming from Kansas as she does, she is the reader’s inroad to Dorothy’s Oz.  Many parallels are drawn between Amy and Dorothy; both are originally from Kansas, both were feeling trapped in their mundane lives with little escape from their farm/small town before their arrival in Oz.  Both are sensitive to the magic that is all around in Oz.

The worldbuilding.  While it’s fair to say that L. Frank Baum did a lot of the heavy lifting in his creation of the world of Oz, Paige has added her own twist to the world.   Baum’s Oz is clearly identifiable in the book, but there is a much darker twist to it with Dorothy’s influence.  It’s based on the children’s novels rather than the 1939 Judy Garland film in that there are characters mentioned who are in the books not in the movie, and also that the original slippers are silver not red.  I would suggest you read No Place Like Oz first before coming to Dorothy Must Die to get an idea of the background.

Good vs Wicked and Trust.  The question of trust and whom to trust and whom not to trust comes up too many times for it not to be a major theme in the series.  Amy is working for the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked and is repeatedly advised by the operatives not to trust anyone.  It’s clear that they don’t trust Amy either, keeping her in the dark until the last possible moment.  It’s a common trope in good vs evil fantasy that the good guys always win because they trust their colleagues to have their backs and are willing to sacrifice themselves for the greater good whereas the bad guys are too busy looking out for themselves to implement any cohesive plans or trust their colleagues to work with them.  Although the so-called wicked have come together in Dorothy Must Die they don’t have that trust that good guys have.  It’s an interesting twist and I look forward to seeing how it plays out in subsequent books.

Writing style.  I did enjoy Paige’s writing style.  It came across as fresh and immediate and really brought me into the story.

What I didn’t like

Pacing.  Here we come to the main problem I had with Dorothy Must Die; the pacing was off.  For a significant chunk of the first half of the book Amy is training with the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked yet, due to trust issues mentioned above, has not been given a goal to work towards except the vague Dorothy Must Die.  This section drags on far too long and really slows the book down.  I would encourage you to work past this section though – it improves a lot once Amy is working on a more specific goal.

Misleading marketing.  HarperCollins’ blurb for Dorothy Must Die contains the following:

“My name is Amy Gumm—and I’m the other girl from Kansas.I’ve been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked.I’ve been trained to fight.And I have a mission: Remove the Tin Woodman’s heart.Steal the Scarecrow’s brain.Take the Lion’s courage.Then and only then—Dorothy must die!”

If that is the blurb you’re using to hook readers into the book, it might be a good idea to have your protagonist actually work towards that goal in that book and not have it be a supposed finale twist that Dorothy can’t die until the Tin Woodman, Scarecrow and Lion have been neutralised.  Clearly, it’s a blurb for the series as a whole not just Dorothy Must Die.  When reading the book please bear this in mind so that you are not frustrated at the end.

The audio narration.  In general I really liked Devon Sorvari’s narration.  She really brought out Amy’s strength of character and kick-ass attitude.  However there were long pauses left at the end of each paragraph – long enough to be very noticeable and very irritating.  I kept wondering if I’d reached the end of a chapter.  Of course, it may not bother you at all.  Here’s a sample.

In general though I really enjoyed Dorothy Must Die and will definitely continue with the rest of the series.  Amy is a really great character and I love the world of Oz.  I look forward to seeing more.

I gave Dorothy Must Die four stars out of five.

 buy from Amazon, Kobo, iTunes, Audible, eBooks.com